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Ulcer operation may be new way to treat obesity


An old ulcer operation is getting new attention as a possible alternative obesity surgery: a quick snip of a nerve that helps control hunger.
It’s far from clear if cutting the vagus nerve really helps — initial pilot studies in a few dozen patients have just begun. Skeptics abound, and even proponents say it wouldn’t lead to nearly as much weight loss as more traumatic operations that shrink the stomach and reroute intestines.
More than 177,000 people underwent obesity surgery last year, according to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. The most popular method is gastric bypass, stapling the stomach to create a tiny pouch. Options include placing an adjustable band around the stomach, or cutting off the stomach’s side and rerouting the intestines.

| Tags: Digestive, Weight Loss |

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